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the secret money flowing through our elections, state, local, and national level . it is money that flows through nonprofit groups like karl rove's group or there used to be a group called priorities usa aligned with president obama. we have seen an explosion of what we call dark money. this is money where we do not know who the donors are. and we do not know how the money is being spent in many cases. we have made it a priority of ours here, and mine in particular, to try to shine a light on this secret money having an incredible impact on knowlections where we so little about where it is coming from. host: when you do your work for "mother jones," how much is mining the public database? guest: it is in all of the above approach to be honest. if you want to know anything about classified forms and 990 's, i am your guy. i can give you a crash course in work.per pac's there's a lot of mining of those information sources. there is a lot of information out there. a lot of corporations tell us how they spend the money. they hide it on their website. you do not really know how to look or to f
to egypt today. detroit and new york electing mayors. voters in new jersey and new york will be electing a new governor. morning and we are going to begin with a new gallup poll, asking you about the state of your life and your thoughts about the country in general. to you feel more optimistic about where you are going? do you have the opportunities to get ahead? we are asking the yes and -- asking a yes and no question. the number is -- you can also send us an e-mail, send us a tweet, or join us on facebook.com. this is what the question looks like on our twitter page. do you think there is an opportunity to get ahead in america i? , ifd on the new gallup poll you want to check it out it is online at gallup.com. opportunitynty of to get ahead here in america. the survey was released over the last couple of days. while the u.s. has historically prided itself on an open ended mobility, celebrating rags to riches stories, rising income inequality and a normally -- and abnormally high unemployment rate can call the question just how accurate this cherished belief is. politicians have focuse
believed in and practiced ability and bipartisanship. his view was after the elections were over, democrats and republicans should work together to deal with a national legislative agenda. seeing his strong leadership qualities and the belief in getting things done for the american people, speaker tip o'neill appointed him to be the whip and he was unanimously elected to be our majority leader and then our speaker in 1989. he worked closely with bob michael and they remain great friends after they left congress. later, president clinton named speaker foley to be our ambassador to japan. as a staffer to war and, i worked with him on the spokane world's in the created traumatic change for the largest city in the fifth district. tom was so proud to represent the people of the fifth are congressional district and he always thought this was his most important responsibility. it was a great honor for me that he supported me and my campaign. i was lucky to receive his support as a member of the house and i will always thank him for being such a good mentor. we will always remember the legacy of to
that as iraq prepare for the 2014 elections and faces challenges to a secure better future for the people, iraq and kept on the support of the u.s. institute for peace for a partner on all levels, starting with the community, two local councils, to international dialogue. thank you. >> i would like to ask the ambassador to come forward. the format today will be an introduction -- it will be an introduction of the prime minister by the ambassador, and then the prime minister will speak and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps you have already written them out, we will not have time for a great number of questions, and hopefully the prime minister will find questions interesting, hopefully not too provocative, and with that let me turn it over. >> mr. prime minister, welcome to the delegation. some of my longtime associates are especially welcome. it is wonderful to be here with secretary albright. it is wonderful to be here at usip. i want to thank them for the great work that they have been involved with since last year, and the work that
cole was diagnosed with down's syndrome. >> i was single when i was elected to congress. it isn't what you expect, it isn't what you dream, but i sit here today and i'm a better person because of cole and what he has taught me. i'm a better legislator. he's given me a whole new passion for what i do here on capitol hill. >> how so? >> well, when you first get the news, it's some of the most difficult news you receive as a parent. i look back, i would be welcomed by the disabilities community. people across the country that have been through similar experiences. but first of all reached out and said it will be okay. that meant everything to us at that point and having different people contact me. but i quickly -- i quickly, you know, just decided, you know what? i'm going to -- first of all, we're going to -- we're going to the everything we can to maximize cole's development. we want to see what he can be. and so you go to work. you learn everything that you can about down's syndrome or whatever disability you may be. and then i quickly became grateful for so many who have walked this
national elections. if you look back at 2012 and that moment in the campaign when the vice president at his debate , it was a key moment, and job i delivered to the ticket. -- joe biden deliver to the ticket. the president knew he would. that is why he asked them to be his running mate and why remember any doubt among anybody here that he would be the running mate in 2012. enjoyedthe president quality time with ill clinton -- with bill clinton? >> he does. >> the president made a comment -- >> i have not read the book. two, i am sure it is filled with a lot of great color and detail allt a campaign that like national campaigns is filled with ups and downs and turns and twists. i am sure it will be a great read. what i can tell you is the president is enormously grateful for the advice and assistance that he received from president clinton during the campaign and the council he has received throughout his presidency from one of his only living predecessors. that relationship has only strengthened ever since the president, then senator, ran for the nomination against president clinton's wife.
it was a part of life. my uncle was a flamboyant politician. in 1947 or 1948, he was elected. he was 20 years old. you had to be at least 21 to serve. he turned 21 when he was serving. he was one of the famous civil rights before it was even thought about. he was defeated on that issue. he did not think there should be two sets of books, one for black children and one for white children. they defeated him on that. that's back in 1950. he served with robert byrd. family was always important. we had to start working. i heard the awfullest racket and this arguing back and forth and i went back there and there was robert byrd and my grandfather. different parts of the bible and verses and what they meant. my grandfather said, i think you might want to meet this person. he is running for united states senator. that was many years ago. if you can imagine, the 1960 campaign changed our family because of john f. kennedy. we were catholic. knowing that was going to be a big part of this election, could he break the religious barrier? i never thought there was a barrier. my home town, ever
. elect is notm required the growth of government, but a cultural shift for the roles of families and -- as the center of who we are as a nation. transforming education and economically driven immigration system and energy policy based on north american resources and american ingenuity and committed family life over start prosperity for many americans to what we had today. there is another important part of this. economic freedom in all of its forms will sustain prosperity over the long haul. no one understood that editor -- that better than jack. driving american supply-side economic and carrying -- tearing down the barriers in the capital leftm for those who are behind. those policies lead to exponential growth that we the leadership of ronald reagan. many people benefited from that .rowth than what we have today conservatives need to advance economic freedom for this of a vacation of the tax code and lower tax rates. these of the lost productivity, the lost jobs, misallocated capital from the convoluted tax code in the world. conservatives need to advance economic freedom throu
for and the people that we elect, are the people that hold the future in their hands. they are our leaders. >> what were the rules or the restrictions when you would go into these homes, and how much video and you have on each fellow? >> i will take those separately. i guess, the restrictions were quite straightforward. anything that we film, we could use in the film, but if anyone was uncomfortable at any time, they can tell us to go away, stop filming, and i would always listen to those requests. that is how i always work. it is really difficult if you give characters or participants control later, but they have control while it is happening. >> and how much time did you spend around each one? people, hopefully think we spent three years with them, but really it was between five and 15 shoots, and they could be anywhere from a couple of hours to a few days, and we really did not film as much as you might think, hopefully, seeing the film, and you know we have somewhere between 200 and 300 hours. i really do not film a lot by standards of documentary makers today, i suppose, but i still had a worl
the second term. not were living -- we have yet gotten to why they spent so much time there. the election. did s truman want harry to run for reelection? >> she did not try to stop them. want to be the first still? no. this was a partnership. she knew in his heart of hearts, that is what he believed was best for the country. she supported him. >> so many people would remember . you said earlier everyone was duly to win. whyain so -- >> explain chairman was expected to lose. cressey was not popular at the time. chairman was expected to lose. cressey was not popular at the time. the economy was not going as fast as he could have. cressey was liberal. were tired. not liberal enough for many people. he could do very little right in 1948. his own party did not really support him. it was not 100% certain he would even get the nomination. campaigns on a congress that will not work with them or get anything done. still? no. this was a partnership. and he campaigns on foreign policy. this is where one of everyone's favorite truman stories comes out. shall nominate tells him on a train, go out ther
signed $2 trillion in spending cuts into law. like to say these days, elections matter and the president explicitly stated that he put these on the back of the bipartisan spending cuts. fromet the exit polls november. two thirds said raising taxes to cut the deficit was a nonstarter. whiched to obamacare, more voters said they wanted to repeal, the levels of support are striking. if our friends on the other side contradict -- keep obamacare contradicted by the then have to called the mandate for reducing the size of government day superman date -- a super mandate. this would increase the debt and it is so outrageous. from new yorkator will announce a proposal to give the president permanent power to borrow more. the debtto extend ceiling permanently by going around congress. let me repeat that. the schumer-obama plan is a plan to permanently hand the president a credit card without spending limits in without lifting a finger to address the national debt. truly outrageous especially when you consider our debt is now $17 lookion which makes us like a european country. we need to get our de
and speakers. november 5, election day, goldie hawn will be here at the national press club. gg will be, judd gre here. he plans to unveil protections for investors to be endorsed by the anti-group. november 11, president and ceo of the charles schwab operation. i would like to present our guest with the traditional npc m ug. [applause] i am sorry it did not come from rei. last question we wanted to ask, the most pressing issue for those of us who live here in washington, when will the washington monument reopen? [laughter] we hope to have it open a year from now. there are people who kind of like its exoskeleton. and i have a wonderful job, but it is made more wonderful by some of the places i can go. there have been a few places where i say, can i do this, they say, ma'am, you can do anything you want. i got to climb up the stairs to the scaffolding and then the latter that went to the top of the monument and looked them. i kind of like that exoskeleton. i do not have the exact dates. kate, do your member when we are going to reopen? no, pretty sure it is a year from now. it is not going t
and the iraqi people that as a rock prepares for the 2016 elections, iraq can count on the support of the u.s. institute of peace is a partner on all levels. starting with the communities, to local councils, two dialogues. thank you. [applause] >> i would like to ask beth jones to come forward. the format today will be an introduction of the prime minister by ambassador beth jones. then the prime minister will speak. and then sit and take questions. the audience already knows this. if you have questions, perhaps he of written them out, we are not going to have time for a great number of questions, but hopefully the prime minister will find questions interesting. with that, libby turn it over. >> thank you very much. welcome to the delegation. especially welcome, it is great to be here with secretary albright. especially for this extraordinary event. i want to thank u.s. ip on his leadership since he took over last year, and the work that u.s. ip has done for so long in iraq. i am honored to introduce nouri al-maliki, prime minister of the republic of iraq. he faces the daunting challenges i
getting involved with government and campaign. in the end, the people you work for, the people you elect, they're the people with the future in their hands, you know? they're our leaders. >> what are rules with the restrictions going to the homes. how much video do you have on each fellow? >> i'll take it separately. i guess the restrictions are quite straightforward. anything that we film, we can use in the film. but if anyone was uncomfortable at any time, they can tell us to go away. tell us to stop filming. and i would always listen to those requests. i mean, that's how i always work. i mean, it's really difficult if you give characters and participants in your films control later. and they have control while it's happening. >> and how much time did you spend around each one. >> people think we spent three years with them. five to 15 shoots. shoots could be a couple of hours to a few days but we didn't film as much as you might think, hopefully, seeing the film. and in all, probably have 200 and 300 hours. 200 and 300 hours. i don't really film a lot by standards of documentary maker
to holding national parliamentary elections. the strategic agreement gives the united states a unique role in fostering democratic development. we will work with the united nations and iraqi leaders to ensure that all technical requirements to ensure freedom and elections are in place. i want to assure you that if iraq faces these challenges, it will have a committed partner in the united states. our relationship was rooted in respect and interest, as enshrined in the strategic framework agreement, are permanent and enduring roadmap. i thank you for this opportunity and ask you to help me welcome prime minister nouri al-maliki. [applause] >> in the name of god, may the blessing of god be upon you. i want to express my gratitude and esteemed to former congressman mr. jim marshall for his speech. i also want to give my thanks to mbassador beth jones for her warm words, and i want to extend to the u.s. my greetings and gratitude for their words. ecause of the development of he mechanism and the new techniques used by terrorists who undermine interests and institutions in all countries. we are
, now she talks all the time. i am not the one elected, she snapped. i have nothing to say to the public. asked which presidential most identified with, she chose the obscure wife who followed dollar madison. madison. >> he was hinting that he would like her to be more involved. she put her foot down. it was not that she did not want to be involved with her life or her decisions. >> she did what she had to do. she went to the receptions for the military and the parties. -- che collins, sheet olumns she just wasn't going to do that. maybe she was more of a feminist than all of us. >> she was not going to do it use told. >> she began to feel that the president began to dissolve the political partnership which had been at the heart of their relationship with her husband for so many years. >> in the senate, he had time to come home in the evening and discuss things with bess. but when he became president, your decisions multiply rapidly. it was not that he did not want to consult her. he did not have time to consult her on every little thing. harry truman had a lot of momentous things to dis
politician. he was the youngest house of delegates number -- member back in 1947 or 1948, he was elected. 1948. he was 20 years old. you had to be at least 21 to serve. he turned 21 when he was serving. he was one of the famous civil rights before it was even thought about. he was defeated on that issue. he did not think there should be two separate books, one for black children and one for white children. they defeated him on that. that's back in 1950. he served with robert byrd. family was always important. we had to start working. i heard -- and this arguing back and forth and i went back there and there was robert byrd and my grandfather. different parts of the bible and verses and what they meant. my grandfather said, i think you might want to meet this person. he is running for united states senator. that was many years ago. if you can imagine, the 1960 campaign changed our family because of john f. kennedy. we are catholic. knowing that was going to be a big part of this election, could he break the religious barrier? i never thought there was a barrier. my home town, everybody wo
. and one of the most important expressions of that will be elections next year. i encouraged that iraq pass an election law and that that moves forward so that people understand that when they have differences they can express them politically, as opposed to through violence. [speaker translates] i also appreciated the efforts that prime minister maliki has made recently to restore stronger relationships with its neighbors, including kuwait and turkey and some of the other gulf states, and expressed my interest in providing whatever support is necessary to make sure that iraq is working cooperatively and effectively with its neighbors. [speaker translates] >> we spent considerable amount of time talking about syria, where the spillover effects of the chaos and assad's horrific treatment of his own people has had spillover effects in iraq as well. [speaker translates] >> and we agreed that it's in the interest of both countries to try to bring about a political settlement, a political transition, inside of syria that allows the syrian people to make decisions about their own lives, while, a
of election to fill the vacancy created by the death of senator frank launtberg of new jersey. the certificate, the chair is advised, is in the form suggested by the senate. if there is no objection the reading of the certificate will be waived and it will be printed in full in the record. if the senator elect will now present himself to the desk the chair will administrator the oath. -- mr. the oath. -- please raise your right hand. >> will you please raise yoush right han. do you solemnly swear that you will support and defend the constitution of the united states, that you will bear true faith and allegiance to the same that you take this obligation freely without any mental reservation and that you will well and faithfully discharbling the duties of the office on which you are about to enter? >> i do. >> congratulations, senator. [applause] >> senators return monday at 2:00 p.m. eastern. it would ban workplace discrimination against gay, sbian, and transgendered persons. they will two on two judicial nominations. also hold a procedural vote to limit debate on the employee nondiscrimination
in and practiced ability and bipartisanship. his view was after the elections were over, democrats and republicans should work together to deal with a national legislative agenda. seeing his strong leadership qualities and the belief in getting things done for the american people, speaker tip o'neill appointed him to be the with and he was unanimously elected to be our majority leader and then our speaker in 1989. he worked closely with bob michael and they remain great friends after they left congress. later, president clinton named speaker foley to be our ambassador to japan. as a staffer to war and, i worked with him on the spokane world's in the created traumatic change for the largest city in the fifth district. tom was so proud to represent the people of the fifth are congressional district and he always thought this was his most important responsibility. it was a great honor for me that he supported me and my campaign. i was lucky to receive his support as a member of the house and i will always thank him for being such a good mentor. we will always remember the legacy of tom foley. he beli
. they went after the elected prime minister of the congo in 1960. their last monster was fidel castro who also survived in their attempts to depose him. >> where were they born? >> the dulles brothers were born and grew up in watertown, new york. actually, foster dulles was born , because his mother came here to live with her father for a few months. watertown, new york on the shores of lake ontario was kind of a playground for the new york rich. the father was not a political --was not a clue took rat was not a plutocrat, he was a clergyman. the family was extraordinary. these two brothers grew up in a religious environment. they said their prayers everyday. in the morning, they would take a cold shower, the only kind their father would allow. they would say their prayers, sing a few hymns and then they were free to run down to the shores of lake ontario where relatives were taking them out fishing. those relatives were both secretaries of state. their grandfather, john watson foster had been secretary of state in the 1890's. he was the first to preside over the overthrow of a foreign go
and here are your headlines -- it is one day to election day in several states and political watchers will look for clues for future congressional races in tomorrow's outcome in key battlefields including virginia. political the ongoing battle over the rollout of the affordable care act continue to play out on the sunday shows yesterday. we will get to those stories this morning on "the washington journal." first, we will talk about a bill that would bill -- that would ban discrimination in the workplace that faces a key senate procedural vote today. we will hear your thoughts on the employment nondiscrimination act and what you think it means when it comes to public opinion on gay rights in america today. give us a call -- with us ono catch up all your favorite social media pages. you can also e-mail us. good monday morning to you. i want to take you to the headline in today's "wall street journal." vote to procedural proceed to debate is happening today. here is the story in today's "new york times." we will be looking at more from that story later but here's the front page of today
me. shortly after i was elected president i invited speaker foley to come to arkansas to see me to tell me everything i didn't know that was about to happen to me. which tom foley proceeded to do in that calm, reare strained balanced lyrical way. lulled by ot to be bob michael's friendliness, that he was a very tough adversary but i could make a deal with him. he told me not to be intimidated mr. speaker by your vell cossty because you were a brilliant politician but at the end we would find a way to do business. in the end he turned to be right about both things. his leadership made possible . ings that matter to me a lot being president is a matter of trying to do what you promised to do when you ran, trying to respond to legitimate impulses that are coming out of the political system and trying to deal with the unanticipated developments. and if you ignore any of them, you cannot prevail. and if you can't work with the congress, it's very difficult. tom foley therefore was pivotal for my andslide victory economic and deficit reduction won by one vote. that was made possible
a presidential election going on in afghanistan. signs of that when you were there? >> a lot of evidence of it actually. when i say evidence, a lot of about it.n not evidence. the signs, the answer is we didn't see visible signs. discussion about it and a lot of confidence that it is going to happen. what,heduled for april 10? >> i don't know the exact date but it is in april. the military there are pretty confident that they are going to be able to prevent the taliban from disrupting it. taliban goal would be to make it so that the afghan people don't have outcome?ce in the scout afterat does karzai do all that? go and establish a presidential library? >> no, he has got -- he is building a modest little apartment for himself. 10,000 or 20,000 square feet or whatever it is. on the grounds. that he will -- he is going to stick around. a> you think we will have genuine transition. there are how many candidates? >> 11 left or 10 was it? heard there were 10 out there. >> and do we -- >> i thought my staff would me.p ten, thank you, bill. >> and do we -- what do we happens post-karzai afghani
illegals are the better way to go. i do not believe in the election -- collection of the metadata in this country. we have other mechanisms to wiretap you go through the courts. the problem with illegals -- they did not get very much. there were 10 of them here and that was an unusual number. usually the russians would have one or two, but 10 is a big number. you think they must have stolen all kinds of stuff, but there is no evidence they did. living out in montclair, new jersey, where there are not too many national security secrets. i do not think there a lot of secrets. it is tempting to think illegals are the solution. there is no evidence in this case that they came up with anything worth talking about. host: how you feel about outsourcing of fbi, nsa, and homeland security? would we be better serve the security services were in house? guest: i think the jury is out. contractors are hired because they do not have enough people to do some of this work in- house. we have seen that the company that was doing the vetting of these contractors was overburdened. one woman in los an
tonight at 8:00 on c-span's "q&a." journal,"washington we look ahead to the 2014 midterm elections with charlie cook, the editor in publisher of the "cook political report." he will talk about next week's elections for governor in virginia and new jersey. farzad oft, roberin a "bloomberg businessweek." then an update on the latest in syria, including an effort to locate and destroy the country's chemical weapons with mona yacou bian. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: good morning, it is a back to work week for both the house and senate. secretary of state john kerry making an unannounced visit to egypt today. detroit and new york electing mayors. voters in new jersey and new york will be electing a new governor. morning and we are going to begin with a new gallup poll, asking you about the state of your life and your thoughts about the country in general.
the prime minister. >> first of all, he talks about john major winning elections and he is right. he beat a weak and incredible labe -- lay bour leader. john major also said and he is absolutely right, the first thing he said was that labour's policy was unworkable and he is absolutely right. so what we need to do is recognize there are four bits to an energy bill. there are the whole sale prices which are beyond our control. thrrs the cost of transmission and the grid which are difficult to change. there are the profits of the energy company. and there are the green regulations. and it is those last two that we need to get to grips with. so i can tell the house today that we will be having a proper competition test carried out over the next year to get to the bottom of whether this market can be more competitive. i want more companies, i want better regulation, i want better deals for consumers. but yes, we also need to roll back the green charges that he put in place as energy secretary. >> mr. speaker he really is changing his policy every day of the week. his energy secretary who is i
. this guy got elected and he got elected to change trade policy, to change the insane tax policy, to change the policy dealing with antitrust. for the past five years, what you people have been able to do whichus on this obamacare has very little to do with the ,verall economy versus the wars the insane trade policies or insane tax policies. all of this is a smokescreen. it is almost like weapons of mass destruction. if you're going to say here and the 15,000 when you have 20,000 on unemployment. 100 million people are living in poverty -- this is all this is. this is just politics to of peoples issue being critical of the president? we are at the point of this country where the whole thing is completely collapsed. after they at obama, had three years of borscht, the system needed the opposite. you people in the media created barack obama. and said of him coming in addressing the policies -- instead of him coming in addressing the policies, now you can talk about obamacare. i grew up in detroit. -- i wrotegreat book it. belt."g back the rust host: i think we got your point. scott, texas, re
in the summer or next fall or before the election. by and large, the government shut down drove everybody's numbers down but particularly republicans and they were lucky there was no election immediately after that. if they had, there might have been a slight chance that they would lose the house. it pushed them down to pretty low levels of approval in popularity. there is plenty of time and plenty of events we cannot foresee that will happen between ow and november 2014 that will make any prediction useless and the relevant. host: let's look ahead to 2016. guest: even better. host: you brought up the 47% story which won a george polk award. how will that story be remembered in relation to future elections? guest: i'm assuming everyone will be more careful about what they say. looking back at the video, once the dust settled, it struck me that why hasn't this happened before? we have had years of people running around and everybody has a video recorder, not everybody, but they have it in their pocket with their smartphones and yet nobody had really been caught in such a manner as mitt rom
are drawn, the pressures that those of us in elected office are under somehow preclude the possibility of that brand of leadership. well, i believe we have to find our way back there. now, more than ever. america needs public servants who are willing to place from solving ahead of politics. as the letter that president clinton held up indicates, the history of the crime bill shows. we are sent here to do what is right. sometimes, doing what is right is hard. it is not free. and yet, that is the measure of leadership. it is important for us who feel that responsibility to fight for a cause to recognize our cause is not advanced if we cannot also try to achieve compromise. the same way our founders sought it. as a vital part of our democracy. the very thing that makes our system of self-government possible. that is what tom foley believed. that is what he embodied. that is the legacy that shines rightly today. on the last day he presided as speaker, he described what it should feel like to serve the american people in this city. he spoke about coming to work in the morning and catching a
and discrimination during election campaigns. i would like to ask the prime minister, mr. speaker, whether he will back our call to get political parties the electoral commission and equality and human rights commission to work more proactively now in areas of tension so that the next general election can be a battle of ideas and not raise hate and discrimination? >> i very much welcome what the honorable lady says. and i welcome the report of your parliamentary inquiry into electoral conduct. i will study the report and if there is anything we do cross party cooperation we take racism out of politics we will certainly do so. >> thank you, mr. speaker. thanks to the government's regional growth, 8 million is reopening the rail, cutting travel times between birmley and manchester in half. better rail connections to the south of england are also vital. does the prime minister not agree with me it is absolutely outrageous for the party opposite to challenge hs-2 at current time putting in jeopardy and jobs an investment in the north of england? >> i think my right honorable friend is absolutely
it longer. that would make for one-third less campaigns and elections, all of the expenses associated with that. i'll hang up listening. guest: one of the projects that we have under way at the bipartisan policy center is a democracy project, we call it the democracy project which we launched earlier this year where we are looking into the specific issues that you mentioned, jack, as it relates to government filibusters, campaign finance the issues of redistricting out there. first of all, i think i agree with you, jack, this is more than just spending and revenues. structure. some of the issues that have created difficulties and coming to agreements going forward. at the same time, jack, i guess i'm an old senate staffer, i'm going to have to disagree with you on the filibuster. i do believe that the great deliberative body here called the united states senate, that the filibuster does have a role to play. think our founding fathers made it very clear they expected to be these kinds of conflicts but expected that the passions of the house would be cooled by the senate as george washi
was about the next victory. it was never about last month's defeat, never. >> he said to me elections are about tomorrow night yesterday. -- not yesterday. >> we will ask for the support of every single american. our appeal of boundless opportunity crosses every barrier of geography, grace, and belief in america. we are not going to leave anybody out of this opportunity. [applause] everything but we will speak to every heart. in word and action, we will represent the entire american family. that's what we must the all about. [applause] ♪ [applause] ♪ >> thank you for watching that with us. i know it brings a lot of wonderful memories to many of you who worked with him. mr. speaker, we know that you have places to be. you are good, thank you. [applause] i did not know that i would have to excuse the speaker of the house. [laughter] so, this evening, before we get to the main course, we have a wonderful main course. i introduce our awardee, would like to introduce you to a good friend of mine and the kemp family. group vice president of ford motor company, a great american company
that would oversee elections are not entirely well. but while a framework for the installation of a caretaker government remains, squabbling between the islamists and the secular opposition has slowed the progress and reintroduced uncertainty into tunisia's fragile politics. political institution building and creating a culture of good governance will require targeted assistance, training programs and a lot of patience. egypt and tunisia may be a mess now, but 10 years from now will not be the same as they are today, and we can play a role in helping to shape that future. think of some of the other countries that have democratized in recent years in eastern europe, asia and latin america. the transitions have not been quick or smooth, and many of them are still ongoing. amid the euphoria of the collapse of the communist block in europe, we thought we were at a end of history -- the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair now recognizes the gentleman from north carolina, mr. jones, for five minutes. mr. jones: mr. speaker, thank you very much. at this point in our nati
collecting the walnuts. when i got elected to congress my father said i had been well- trained to go to washington because i had been dodging knots all my life. nuts.ging [laughter] from my parents, hard work, sacrifice, commitment, dedication, fighting for what , those are achieve what make america great. those who are willing to respond to the trumpet, the call to service that helps preserve our democracy for the future. this dinner and anyways honest people who have answered the basic call a public service you have been asked to serve your community with your philanthropy and, more importantly, with your time, your commitment, with your energy. award,, as i accept this i would like to share it with all of those who have served with me in my different capacities because it is their service and their commitment that made whenever i was able to achieve happen. my own personal commitment to public service bus from my and my who said i, brothers, oh do something back to the country for what they had given them. somehing back to the country. learning what it meant to be in order toacrif
. in particular, we have heard how elected representatives are unable to hear all of the information about the programs, to engage the cleared staff and have conversations with each other about the issues involved. to my knowledge, we have not elected any terrorist to congress. we are not in a position where we have terrorists in the judiciary or operating isp's. from safeguarding those individuals, it is really counterproductive to the interest of the nation. i would suggest you look at that is one thing that might be considered. in general, i believe classification is overused. anything that is classified should be classified only to protect the safety of a party or for operational efficacy. it not -- should not be used to hide things from the american public. things that are classified when the american -- when they come out, the american public should not be ashamed of what the government is doing, and we have seen instances of that in the past few months. won't makecomment i us more technical. i circulated a set of fair information privacy practices that have been put together by the
on sunday for the election of that state policy next governor. -- that state's next governor. jesse is up next on the lines. caller: i think they should keep spying. average americans don't know how safe they are because of spying. on theme not spying they are definitely spying on us. the average american does not know how safe they are? caller: exactly. host: next from texas, a republican caller. what are your thoughts he e -- thought seattle caller: -- thoughts? caller: i don't have anything with spying. it should be else with the agency in congress about what they can and can't do. my main concern is because of the move toward more socialism and more control over people in and openmaintain roads bigger agendas, all of that information is going to be used at later times. buildings are being built to house an incredible amount of information. down the road, it is inconceivable this kind of thing that could be done. how many actual terror attacks are espionage. good information has been received as a result of this particular act. insidious kindn of encroachment. i don't want to sound lik
which is -- budget issues. it is something that can make a comeback in an election year. that is something that you look forward to come up next summer as we approach the midterms. host: we are talking about the budget and time. the legislative days left in the session -- less than three weeks, but how does that factor going forward? guest: they have only so many days to be here, and the bar has been raised since they came out of the shutdown. there is a budget conference meeting, a farm bill conference meeting, and immigration reform, as things that the president wants to see done this year. any one of those moving this year would be huge. as the days pass by, there is less time to get anything done on any of these things. if any one of those things advances, that is a huge win. duca --mes from china from chattanooga. ifler: i would like to know it would lower the egos of some of these people in congress if they could sit down and do a smaller appropriations bill, and that is what i would like to know. host: you want to start? guest: i am not sure it would affect egos.
months ago, in other words, after the 2012 election. because as we are seeing this , we are becoming aware of all of the problems that are in it. so someone had pointed out well, you had 3.5 years to make it, this website, and the computer person said well, actually, no, it has only been eight or nine months. i think if all of these problems had been articulated prior to the 2012 election, who knows, maybe it would have gone another way. host: ok, we will go to carol now from same, -- from st. louis, missouri. is it time to start assigning blame for some of the early problems with the health care exchange rollout? caller: actually, i hold the president responsible. here is what i hold him responsible for -- my grandchildren that are under 26 are covered. my granddaughter, who is 27 with a pre-existing condition, can now get insurance. she had one of those inferior policies, and they paid nothing when she needed it. he closed the donut hole for me on medicare for the prescription drugs, and the man who said it is on acceptable not to be able for his wife to have her own doctor, what i
in the next elections. was named asgh most responsible. to fix it entrusted was jeffrey zeitz. this followed a meeting between vice president joe biden and democratic freshmen. it appeared that the white house would have to do more to reassure democrats who emerged from the shutdown confident of their political fortunes. onublicans have roared back a wave of anger over the health care law. people are anxious. richard derman said -- richard durbin said he did not think there was confidence. this is more of a show me moment. we were all confident that the system would be up and running. we are not confident until it is real. the anxious include senators and house members facing hotly contested races. inre are also lawmakers states with republican governors who have done nothing to promote the health care law. this is the lead story in the new york times this morning. what is your top story this week? we will begin with a democrat in tennessee. diane, what do you think the big story of the week is? about theam concerned reform bill. we have senators have been taking money and enriching themselv
in the summer, before the presidential election, we had zero regulations through the election and since that time period, we've seen 60 regulations put forward by hhs. my question to you, miss tavenner and cbs news did indicate that the rules were ready to go back in june or july according to one insider that they quoted in their report. so why did hhs stop issuing regulations as the person on the inside of the so-called quarterback of this website? >> so the regulation process, i don't know any point we stopped issuing regulations as you can see. it's been a continuous process. the regulations, we were basically -- >> there was a gap up there. >> i do see the gap. >> how do you account for that? >> a two-month gap. i don't know that would be unusual. if we were to go back, i'm happy to go back and map the last four years. >> we think cbs news missed that? >> i don't know what cbs news did. i'm telling you, we had a continuous regulatory process going on. we have worked with the public. there's obviously a lot of back and forth between us and it would be in a regulation process. it's no
stop after a conference since the election of president rouhani. .ou have let us ask questions there is michael adler who considered -- contribute so much, right? understand sound policy choices. i want to thank you and remind everyone that one president wilson except that the nobel letter,ize in 1919 by he wrote that the cause of peace will be a continuing labor. almost 100 years later, the cause of peace is a continuing labor and a reason that i hope we will make progress. under very iaea strong leadership, your leadership, thank you and thank you all for coming. [applause] >> this concludes our program. thank you to the inspector general for coming. it was a great religion. was a greatn -- it pleasure. great session. here.e a press conference the press could come forward. thank you very much. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> thank you. i'm from japan. korea, howl on north as inspector going back to pyongyang? on -- one question more question on [indiscernible] and investigating contaminated wa
, particularly in the 2010 election. unfortunately, for our economy, for our businesses, for our people, we have done anything but restore certainty. in fact, we have governed by crisis. 30 days, 90 days, 180 days, a year. arbitrary deadlines put in place which brought the country to the brink of default and to the brink of closing down government. and in fact, of course, just recently, we did in fact shut down the government. now, my republican colleagues say we wanted that to happen on our side of the aisle. ironically, 198 democrats voted to open the government. that is to say every democrat that was voting on this floor voted to open government. and my colleagues who say they didn't want to shut down government, 144 of them voted to keep government shut down, mr. speaker, and 87 of them voted to open up government. so the american public is not fooled as to who wanted to shut down the government, but it was a bad policy and lent to uncertainty in our economy. reaching an agreement only for this fiscal year in addition, mr. speaker, will mean more left to do, more sequester left to replace an
are gone. my successor and elected insurance republican commissioner sandy kraeger and i worked on a whole series of plans to expand coverage. i did work on these issues and we were not necessary -- >> you say these were lousy plans and miss tavenner said no true insurance. do you think the plans weren't true insurance? >> in the individual market, the insurance commissioner in kansas and virtually every place in the country -- >> it's a yes -- >> it's a yes or no question. were they true insurance plans? >> a lot of them are not true insurance plans, no. >> i yield back. >> gentleman from vermont. >> i'm going to summarize what i've been hearing. number one, the website must be fixed. you've been very forthright and you're going to fix it. number two, we've had a real battle about health care, had a battle in this congress. it was passed and the president signed it and the supreme court affirmed it, a brutal battle. there was an election people where the american people affirmed it and then the shut down in the threat of deabt default. all of us represent people who are going to win or lo
talks about john major winning elections, and he's right. he bk wheat and incredible labor leader. , and he isalso said absolutely right, was that labor's policy was unworkable and he is absolutely right. what we need to do is recognize their are four pieces to an energy bill. there are the wholesale prices which are beyond our control, there are the costs of transmission and the grid, which are difficult to change, their other prophets of the energy company and there are the green regulations. it is those last two that we need to get to grips with. i can tell the house today that we will be having a proper competition test carried out over the next year to get to the bottom of whether this market can be more competitive. , i wantore companies better regulations, i want better deals for consumers. but yes, we also need to roll back the green charges that he put in place as energy secretary. and you really -- he's changing his policy every week. his energy secretary said it has nothing to do with green taxes. vote loue man who says to go green? it was him. what is weak.u it is not
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